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#63534 - 17 Oct 07 22:33 The Streets of Jakarta - circa 2045
flingwing Offline
Member++

Registered: 28 May 07
Posts: 188
Loc: Jakarta
In the current Asia Times Online there are two articles that may be of interest to any internationalists frequenting this forum who will be living in or even thinking about Indonesia in 2045. The first story concerns the long-term issue of piracy the Tri-border area of the Sulawesi Sea. The three bordering nations, Philippines, Malaysia, and Indonesia, are trying to control these pirates now. Note, too, that many of these pirates now are Muslim religious terrorists out to finance their operations. See <http://www.atimes.com/atimes/Southeast_Asia/IJ18Ae01.html>

The second article is about the shape of mankind's warfare for the next 100 years. This, many Western war-fighting experts believe will involve mainly Urban Operations - fighting in cities.

Below is an excerpt from Page Two of the story. If you're interested in reading the whole thing, go to Page One at <http://www.atimes.com/atimes/Front_Page/IJ16Aa01.html>

Fighting in the City of Your Choice, 2045
Discrimination, it turned out, didn't mean legal constraint. Speakers and conference-goers alike repeatedly lamented the way international law and similar hindrances stood in the way of unleashing chemical agents and emerging technologies. Microwave-like pain rays and other directed energy weapons - such as the Active Denial System which inflicts an intense burning sensation on victims - were reoccurring favorites. During their PowerPoint presentation, the men from Lite Machines, for instance, showed a computer rendering of their micro-UAVs attacking an unarmed crowd gathered in a town square with a variety of less-than-lethal weapons like disorienting laser dazzlers and chemical gases (vomiting and tear-gas agents), while a company spokesman regretfully mentioned that international regulations have made it impossible to employ such gases on the battlefield. Undoubtedly, this was a reference to the scorned Chemical Weapons Convention, which has been binding for the last decade.

While the various speakers at the conference focused on the burgeoning inhabitants of the developing world's slum cities as targets of the Pentagon's 100-year war, it was clear that those in the "homeland" weren't about to escape some of its effects either.

When it came to the "homeland", conference participants were particularly focused on moving beyond weaponry aimed at individuals, like rubber bullets. Needed in the future, they generally agreed, were technologies that could target whole crowds at once - not just rioters but even those simply attending "demonstrations that could go violent".

Other futuristic UO [Urban Operation] concepts are also coming home. According to Fox of the Joint Urban Operations Office, the Department of Justice, like the military, is currently working on sense-through-wall technologies. His associate Duane Schattle is collaborating with the US Northern Command (NORTHCOM) - set up by the Bush administration in 2002 and whose area of operations is "America's homefront" - on such subjects as "sharing intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance, command and control capabilities". He also spoke at the conference about developing synergy between the Departments of Defense and Homeland Security in regard to urban-operations technologies. He, too, expressed his hope that microwave weapon technology would be made available for police use in this country.

A specific goal of DARPA, as a slide in deputy chief Leheny's presentation made clear, is to "make a foreign city as familiar as the soldier's backyard".This would be done through the deployment of intrusive sensor, UAV [Unmanned Aerial Vehicle] , and mapping technologies. In fact, there were few imaginable technologies, even ones that not so long ago inhabited the wildest frontiers of science fiction, that weren't being considered for the 100-year battle these men are convinced is ahead of us in the planet's city streets. The only thing not evidently open to discussion was the basic wisdom of planning to occupy foreign cities for a century to come. Even among the most thoughtful of these often brainy participants, there wasn't a nod toward, or a question asked of, the essential guiding principle of the conference itself.

With their surprisingly bloodless language, antiseptic PowerPoint presentations, and calm tones, these men - only one woman spoke - are still planning Iraq-style wars of tomorrow. What makes this chilling is not only that they envision a future of endless urban warfare, but that they have the power to drive such a war-fighting doctrine into that future; that they have the power to mold strategy and advance weaponry that can, in the end, lock Americans into policies that are unlikely to make it beyond these conference-room doors, no less into public debate, before they are unleashed.

These men may be mapping out the next hundred years for urban populations in cities across the planet. At the conference, at least, which cities, exactly, seemed beside the point. Who could know, after all, whether in, say, 2045, the target would be Mumbai, Lagos, or Karachi - though one speaker did offhandedly mention Jakarta, Indonesia, a city of nine million today, as a future possibility.

–end excerpt-

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#63548 - 18 Oct 07 18:48 Re: The Streets of Jakarta - circa 2045 [Re: flingwing]
Ena Offline
Member*

Registered: 26 Nov 05
Posts: 765
Loc: Sydney
that's quite chilling.
2045,not that far down the track now is it.
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#63580 - 19 Oct 07 20:43 Re: The Streets of Jakarta - circa 2045 [Re: Ena]
Ena Offline
Member*

Registered: 26 Nov 05
Posts: 765
Loc: Sydney
this was to be the year 2000
grin
Will Life Be Worth Living in 2,000AD?


July 22, 1961, Weekend Magazine

Glamour Undies!
Allay inflammation!

Beats dandruff 3 ways!
3" larger - guaranteed!Learn at home!


What sort of life will you be living 39 years from now? Scientists have looked into the future and they can tell you.

It looks as if everything will be so easy that people will probably die from sheer boredom.

You will be whisked around in monorail vehicles at 200 miles an hour and you will think nothing of taking a fortnight's holiday in outer space.

Your house will probably have air walls, and a floating roof, adjustable to the angle of the sun.

Doors will open automatically, and clothing will be put away by remote control. The heating and cooling systems will be built into the furniture and rugs.

You'll have a home control room - an electronics centre, where messages will be recorded when you're away from home. This will play back when you return, and also give you up-to-the minute world news, and transcribe your latest mail.

You'll have wall-to-wall global TV, an indoor swimming pool, TV-telephones and room-to-room TV. Press a button and you can change the décor of a room.

The status symbol of the year 2000 will be the home computer help, which will help mother tend the children, cook the meals and issue reminders of appointments.

Cooking will be in solar ovens with microwave controls. Garbage will be refrigerated, and pressed into fertiliser pellets.

Food won't be very different from 1961, but there will be a few new dishes - instant bread, sugar made from sawdust, foodless foods (minus nutritional properties), juice powders and synthetic tea and cocoa. Energy will come in tablet form.

At work, Dad will operate on a 24 hour week. The office will be air-conditioned with stimulating scents and extra oxygen - to give a physical and psychological lift.

Mail and newspapers will be reproduced instantly anywhere in the world by facsimile.

There will be machines doing the work of clerks, shorthand writers and translators. Machines will "talk" to each other.

It will be the age of press-button transportation. Rocket belts will increase a man's stride to 30 feet, and bus-type helicopters will travel along crowded air skyways. There will be moving plastic-covered pavements, individual hoppicopters, and 200 m.p.h. monorail trains operating in all large cities.

The family car will be soundless, vibrationless and self-propelled thermostatically. The engine will be smaller than a typewriter. Cars will travel overland on an 18 inch air cushion.

Railways will have one central dispatcher, who will control a whole nation's traffic. Jet trains will be guided by electronic brains.

In commercial transportation, there will be travel at 1000 m.p.h. at a penny a mile. Hypersonic passenger planes, using solid fuels, will reach any part of the world in an hour.

By the year 2020, five per cent of the world's population will have emigrated into space. Many will have visited the moon and beyond.

Our children will learn from TV, recorders and teaching machines. They will get pills to make them learn faster. We shall be healthier, too. There will be no common colds, cancer, tooth decay or mental illness.

Medically induced growth of amputated limbs will be possible. Rejuvenation will be in the middle stages of research, and people will live, healthily, to 85 or 100.

There's a lot more besides to make H.G. Wells and George Orwell sound like they're getting left behind.

And this isn't science fiction. It's science fact - futuristic ideas, conceived by imaginative young men, whose crazy-sounding schemes have got the nod from the scientists.

It's the way they think the world will live in the next century - if there's any world left!

©1999 Pixelmatic
http://www.pixelmatic.com.au/2000/

_________________________
http://au.youtube.com/watch?v=bIEOZCcaXzE

..take only what you need..

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