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#53896 - 14 Jun 07 16:42 Kembali kau Flu Burung
Magpie Offline
Member**

Registered: 29 Mar 06
Posts: 1306
Loc: The Toon
Latest news, for those of you who don't know, this a favorite topic of mine. All thanks to The guardian.. http://www.guardian.co.uk (apologies is spelling of title is incorrect, into my second Heineken of the day, and with my skinny body it goes straight to my head!)

Go-ahead for exhumation of politician and diplomat who died in 1918-19 epidemic

Clare Dyer, legal editor
Wednesday February 28, 2007
The Guardian

A celebrated politician and diplomat who played a key role in the carve-up of the Middle East after the first world war is to be called on to perform a final service which could reap incalculable benefits for global health.

Nearly 90 years after his death, researchers hoping to find the best way of treating the predicted bird flu pandemic have been given the go-ahead to exhume the body of Sir Mark Sykes, 6th baronet and co-author of the Sykes-Picot agreement, which dismantled the Ottoman empire.
Sir Mark died at the age of 39 in a Paris hotel room in February 1919 while working for the British government at the Paris peace conference.

He was a victim of the Spanish flu epidemic which claimed at least 30 million lives; he is buried in the churchyard at St Mary's church, Sledmere, on the borders between North and east Yorkshire.

The epidemic was caused by an avian virus, H1N1, which is similar to the current virus, H5N1, and came from a bird in France.

Sir Mark's body was buried in a sealed lead coffin, which the researchers hope will produce well-preserved body samples. These could provide unparalleled insight into the mechanism by which bird flu kills and, with luck, contribute to finding a treatment for the virus.

John Oxford, professor of virology at Queen Mary's College, London, who heads the research team, said there were only five useful samples around the world from the 1918-19 epidemic, and none from a body in a lead coffin. "If we can get a well-preserved body that will be a huge step forward."

Ecclesiastical lawyers said they had not heard of a previous case where a court had given permission for a body to be exhumed for medical research.

Prof Oxford, who rates the chances of a bird flu pandemic as "high", first had to contact Sir Mark's six grandchildren, all of whom gave their consent.

To exhume the remains of someone buried in a Church of England churchyard, permission must be sought from the consistory court for the diocese. There is a presumption against disturbing the bones of the dead, and anyone applying to do so must show exceptional circumstances and strong public interest grounds.

In Sir Mark's case, the research team also needed permission to dig up the coffin of his wife, Edith, who died in 1930 and was buried in the same grave, although the contents of her coffin will not be disturbed.

Peter Collier QC, chancellor of the diocese of York, who gave permission for the exhumation, ruled that there were "strong grounds for believing that the human remains of Sir Mark Sykes might provide sufficient tissue samples of a quality that will enable Prof Oxford's team to carry out research that they have until now not been able to carry out for want of tissue samples of adequate quality".

He also held that "there is a real prospect that the research they wish to carry out, whether by proving or negating the theories advanced by Prof Oxford, will advance the capability of others to combat the H5N1 virus".

He gave permission for the exhumation to take place within 12 months on condition that the vicar, Rev Marie Teare, gave her approval; that the researchers took advice from the Health and Safety Executive; that the grave was shielded from view by appropriate temporary screening during the exhumation and that no prior publicity or notice of the exhumation be given.

The vicar has given her consent but Prof Oxford said he still needed a licence from the Home Office and the approval of his research ethics committee.

The research team hopes to find out how victims of the Spanish flu died - from an overwhelming virus infection, a combined virus and bacterial infection or a cytokine storm which caused the patient's immune system to overwhelm the tissue of the lung.

"Answers to questions about how the 1918 virus operated could have a profound impact on the approaches to the clinical treatment of avian influenza and the use of immune suppressive drugs," said Mr Collier in his judgment.

"Clearly the potential value of Prof Oxford's team's research is very significant."


A short but energetic life

In shorthand, Sir Tatton Benvenuto Mark Sykes was the man who carved up Turkey and caught bird flu, but his 39-year life remains a monument to how much can be achieved in a short time: he was a senior diplomat, MP, father of six, Boer war commander, author of four books and manager of the biggest estate in Yorkshire.

In between times, he created singular sculptures, commissioned the finest Turkish room in the country at his stately home of Sledmere in the Wolds, and maintained a pile of huge Victorian churches donated to nearby hamlets by his eccentric father, also Sir Tatton. Sledmere burned down in 1911, when his father refused to take action until he had finished his pudding.

Left to his own devices by estranged parents, Sykes showed the initiative of ancestors who made a fortune in the wool trade, shipping, pig iron and canny land deals after leaving their home, Sykes Dyke, near Carlisle, for Leeds in the 16th century. His wealth and natural enthusiasm won him influential contacts, such as Lord Kitchener, TE Lawrence "of Arabia", Gertrude Bell and Chaim Weizmann.

He was a central figure in discussions on the future of the Ottoman empire and its Arab lands, where he had often travelled. Sykes died in 1919 at the Versailles peace conference, after negotiating the Sykes-Picot agreement which helped to lay the foundations of modern Turkey. His many descendants include Evelyn Waugh's biographer, Christopher Sykes, and novelist and fashion writer, Plum Sykes.

Martin Wainwright

_________________________
"People say funny things......."

Peter Kay

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#53897 - 14 Jun 07 16:44 Re: Kembali kau Flu Burung [Re: Magpie]
Magpie Offline
Member**

Registered: 29 Mar 06
Posts: 1306
Loc: The Toon
Antibodies from survivors may hold clue to bird flu remedy


An international team of scientists yesterday published evidence of a potential first step towards a treatment of the deadly H5N1 strain of avian flu which has claimed scores of lives around the world.

Their research successfully used antibodies from survivors of the Vietnamese strain of the disease to prevent it developing in mice, and to neutralise the virus in those already infected.

The H5N1 strain has killed millions of birds across the globe and by the middle of this month, according to the World Health Organisation, there had been 306 known cases in humans, 185 of them fatal.

The results from the study, by scientists in Vietnam, Switzerland and the US, were published in the open access journal PLoS Medicine. Because of the international concerns about the disease, the work was fasttracked with funding from the Wellcome Trust in Britain, the National Institute of Health in the US and the Swiss National Science Foundation.

The researchers found the antibodies provided significant immunity to mice that were subsequently infected with the Vietnamese strain of H5N1. It also cut the amount of virus found in the lungs and almost completely prevented it from reaching the brain or spleen.

Cameron Simmons, a Wellcome Trust researcher at the Oxford University clinical research unit in Ho Chi Minh City, said: "We have shown that this technique can work to prevent and neutralise infection by the H5N1 bird flu virus in mice. We are optimistic that these antibodies, if delivered at the right time and at the right amount, could also provide a clinical benefit to humans with H5N1 infections."

He said researchers had found it was possible to administer the treatment up to 72 hours after infection. "This is particularly important as people who have become infected...do not tend to report to their local healthcare facilities until several days after the onset of illness," he said.

The antibodies were found in the laboratory of Antonio Lanzavecchia in Switzerland. Prof Lanzavecchia said although the research was encouraging it did not necessarily mean the antibodies would be useful in any future pandemic.

"Nevertheless, we are encouraged by the broad neutralising activity of these antibodies in the lab and the moderate doses required," he said.

The technique has echoes of treatment during the 1918-19 Spanish H1N1 flu pandemic when physicians used blood taken from survivors to treat patients. A recent review suggested this treatment was associated with a halving in deaths caused by the virus.
_________________________
"People say funny things......."

Peter Kay

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#53904 - 14 Jun 07 18:43 Re: Kembali kau Flu Burung [Re: Magpie]
riccardo Offline
Pujangga

Registered: 12 Oct 05
Posts: 2195
Loc: Jakarta
Welcome back magpie...

This whole bird flu thing has developed into a nice little 'cash cow' for Indonesian officials (or perhaps it's actually 'a golden goose').

This was in today's paper and I know for a fact that those grants are just the tip of the iceberg:
******************************************************
Chief executive officer of the National Committee for Avian Influenza Control and Pandemic Influenza Preparedness, Bayu Krisnamurthi, said Indonesia received a US$10 million grant from the European Commission and a $5 million grant from the Japanese government to be used to control the sources of bird flu and improve surveillance, monitoring and epidemiological studies.

"The surveillance and response programs alone will receive $3.01 million from both donors, which will be distributed through the Directorate General of Live Stock at the Agriculture Ministry."
... .
_________________________
Just here proffering my pearls to swine, my throat to wolves and my trousers to the flagpole.

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#53910 - 15 Jun 07 00:27 Re: Kembali kau Flu Burung [Re: Magpie]
Capt. Mainwaring Offline
Pujangga Besar

Registered: 16 Aug 06
Posts: 3225
Loc: here
Quoting: Magpie
Latest news, for those of you who don't know, this a favorite topic of mine. All thanks to The guardian.. http://www.guardian.co.uk (apologies is spelling of title is incorrect, into my second Heineken of the day, and with my skinny body it goes straight to my head!)

Go-ahead for exhumation of politician and diplomat who died in 1918-19 epidemic

Clare Dyer, legal editor
Wednesday February 28, 2007
The Guardian

A celebrated politician and diplomat who played a key role in the carve-up of the Middle East after the first world war is to be called on to perform a final service which could reap incalculable benefits for global health.

Nearly 90 years after his death, researchers hoping to find the best way of treating the predicted bird flu pandemic have been given the go-ahead to exhume the body of Sir Mark Sykes, 6th baronet and co-author of the Sykes-Picot agreement, which dismantled the Ottoman empire.
Sir Mark died at the age of 39 in a Paris hotel room in February 1919 while working for the British government at the Paris peace conference.

He was a victim of the Spanish flu epidemic which claimed at least 30 million lives; he is buried in the churchyard at St Mary's church, Sledmere, on the borders between North and east Yorkshire.

The epidemic was caused by an avian virus, H1N1, which is similar to the current virus, H5N1, and came from a bird in France.

Sir Mark's body was buried in a sealed lead coffin, which the researchers hope will produce well-preserved body samples. These could provide unparalleled insight into the mechanism by which bird flu kills and, with luck, contribute to finding a treatment for the virus.

John Oxford, professor of virology at Queen Mary's College, London, who heads the research team, said there were only five useful samples around the world from the 1918-19 epidemic, and none from a body in a lead coffin. "If we can get a well-preserved body that will be a huge step forward."

Ecclesiastical lawyers said they had not heard of a previous case where a court had given permission for a body to be exhumed for medical research.

Prof Oxford, who rates the chances of a bird flu pandemic as "high", first had to contact Sir Mark's six grandchildren, all of whom gave their consent.

To exhume the remains of someone buried in a Church of England churchyard, permission must be sought from the consistory court for the diocese. There is a presumption against disturbing the bones of the dead, and anyone applying to do so must show exceptional circumstances and strong public interest grounds.

In Sir Mark's case, the research team also needed permission to dig up the coffin of his wife, Edith, who died in 1930 and was buried in the same grave, although the contents of her coffin will not be disturbed.

Peter Collier QC, chancellor of the diocese of York, who gave permission for the exhumation, ruled that there were "strong grounds for believing that the human remains of Sir Mark Sykes might provide sufficient tissue samples of a quality that will enable Prof Oxford's team to carry out research that they have until now not been able to carry out for want of tissue samples of adequate quality".

He also held that "there is a real prospect that the research they wish to carry out, whether by proving or negating the theories advanced by Prof Oxford, will advance the capability of others to combat the H5N1 virus".

He gave permission for the exhumation to take place within 12 months on condition that the vicar, Rev Marie Teare, gave her approval; that the researchers took advice from the Health and Safety Executive; that the grave was shielded from view by appropriate temporary screening during the exhumation and that no prior publicity or notice of the exhumation be given.

The vicar has given her consent but Prof Oxford said he still needed a licence from the Home Office and the approval of his research ethics committee.

The research team hopes to find out how victims of the Spanish flu died - from an overwhelming virus infection, a combined virus and bacterial infection or a cytokine storm which caused the patient's immune system to overwhelm the tissue of the lung.

"Answers to questions about how the 1918 virus operated could have a profound impact on the approaches to the clinical treatment of avian influenza and the use of immune suppressive drugs," said Mr Collier in his judgment.

"Clearly the potential value of Prof Oxford's team's research is very significant."


A short but energetic life

In shorthand, Sir Tatton Benvenuto Mark Sykes was the man who carved up Turkey and caught bird flu, but his 39-year life remains a monument to how much can be achieved in a short time: he was a senior diplomat, MP, father of six, Boer war commander, author of four books and manager of the biggest estate in Yorkshire.

In between times, he created singular sculptures, commissioned the finest Turkish room in the country at his stately home of Sledmere in the Wolds, and maintained a pile of huge Victorian churches donated to nearby hamlets by his eccentric father, also Sir Tatton. Sledmere burned down in 1911, when his father refused to take action until he had finished his pudding.

Left to his own devices by estranged parents, Sykes showed the initiative of ancestors who made a fortune in the wool trade, shipping, pig iron and canny land deals after leaving their home, Sykes Dyke, near Carlisle, for Leeds in the 16th century. His wealth and natural enthusiasm won him influential contacts, such as Lord Kitchener, TE Lawrence "of Arabia", Gertrude Bell and Chaim Weizmann.

He was a central figure in discussions on the future of the Ottoman empire and its Arab lands, where he had often travelled. Sykes died in 1919 at the Versailles peace conference, after negotiating the Sykes-Picot agreement which helped to lay the foundations of modern Turkey. His many descendants include Evelyn Waugh's biographer, Christopher Sykes, and novelist and fashion writer, Plum Sykes.

Martin Wainwright



You forgot Eric Sykes -

Fuck me , you got a "welcome back" from Riccy , you obviously haven't ever drawn his attention to the shortcomings of the USA and California in particular.
_________________________
I also made a vegetarian version,with tempe and tofu chunks for myself and others.Get over it.
Kosong.Wolo.Setunggal.Setunggal.Setunggal.Kosong.Pitu.Setunggal.Kosong.Wolo=Tempik

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#53913 - 15 Jun 07 01:00 Re: Kembali kau Flu Burung [Re: Capt. Mainwaring]
Roy's Hair Offline
Pujangga Besar

Registered: 08 Nov 06
Posts: 3974
Loc: jakarta
Eric Sykes? Did he get bird flu off Hatty Jacques's fadge??
_________________________
Chinese like more traditional patterns on their ring.

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#53959 - 15 Jun 07 21:28 Re: Kembali kau Flu Burung [Re: Capt. Mainwaring]
Magpie Offline
Member**

Registered: 29 Mar 06
Posts: 1306
Loc: The Toon
Quoting: Capt. Mainwaring


Fuck me , you got a "welcome back" from Riccy , you obviously haven't ever drawn his attention to the shortcomings of the USA and California in particular.


Oh I have had a prod, and he's prodded back, but nothing doing! smile

Put it down to my lovable personality!

anyway back to the news.
_________________________
"People say funny things......."

Peter Kay

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#53961 - 15 Jun 07 21:30 Re: Kembali kau Flu Burung [Re: Magpie]
Magpie Offline
Member**

Registered: 29 Mar 06
Posts: 1306
Loc: The Toon

Indonesian man dies of bird flu after eating sick chickens

JAKARTA (AP): An Indonesian man died of bird flu after eating sick chickens, a leading health official said Thursday, raising the national death toll to 80.

Multiple blood tests confirmed the 28-year-old had the deadly H5N1 strain of the virus, said Bayu Krisnamurthi, the head of the country's bird flu commission.

He was hospitalized on June 9 with high fever, cough and headache and died three days later.

Avian influenza has infected 100 people in Indonesia since it first hit poultry Asian stocks in late 2003, making it the hardest hit country in the world.

http://www.thejakartapost.com/detailgeneral.asp?fileid=20070614171334&irec=11
_________________________
"People say funny things......."

Peter Kay

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#53981 - 16 Jun 07 16:04 Re: Kembali kau Flu Burung [Re: Magpie]
riccardo Offline
Pujangga

Registered: 12 Oct 05
Posts: 2195
Loc: Jakarta
The latest figures worldwide:
Country ...Deaths. Cases. DeathRate
INDONESIA......80...100...80%
THAILAND.......17....25...68%
CHINA..........16....25...64%
VIETNAM........42....93...45%
EGYPT..........15....36...42%
TURKEY..........4....12...33%

Others
IRAQ 2 3
LAOS 2 2
NIGERIA 1 1
CAMBODIA 7 7
DJIBOUTI 0 1
AZERBAIJAN 5 8
Total others................77%


WORLD TOTAL.....191...313...61%


What we can infer from these numbers is that Indonesia's death rate is the highest (for countries with a proper sample of over 10 cases). That more than any other number is an indictment of the health system -- the inability to respond, diagnose and treat properly.
_________________________
Just here proffering my pearls to swine, my throat to wolves and my trousers to the flagpole.

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#53982 - 16 Jun 07 17:41 Re: Kembali kau Flu Burung [Re: riccardo]
Roy's Hair Offline
Pujangga Besar

Registered: 08 Nov 06
Posts: 3974
Loc: jakarta
Wolverhampton Wanderers 3
Stockport County 0
_________________________
Chinese like more traditional patterns on their ring.

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#53983 - 16 Jun 07 18:04 Re: Kembali kau Flu Burung [Re: Roy's Hair]
Gren Offline
Member

Registered: 24 Oct 06
Posts: 21
Loc: Jakarta
I sometimes get very confused on JakChat.

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#53984 - 16 Jun 07 19:01 Re: Kembali kau Flu Burung [Re: riccardo]
Magpie Offline
Member**

Registered: 29 Mar 06
Posts: 1306
Loc: The Toon
Quoting: riccardo


What we can infer from these numbers is that Indonesia's death rate is the highest (for countries with a proper sample of over 10 cases). That more than any other number is an indictment of the health system -- the inability to respond, diagnose and treat properly.


You for got the lack of ability to organise a fart in a bean factory, piss-up in a brewery, pointless demonstation in Indo...... smile
_________________________
"People say funny things......."

Peter Kay

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#53988 - 16 Jun 07 19:42 Re: Kembali kau Flu Burung [Re: Magpie]
Capt. Mainwaring Offline
Pujangga Besar

Registered: 16 Aug 06
Posts: 3225
Loc: here
Quoting: Magpie
Quoting: riccardo


What we can infer from these numbers is that Indonesia's death rate is the highest (for countries with a proper sample of over 10 cases). That more than any other number is an indictment of the health system -- the inability to respond, diagnose and treat properly.


You for got the lack of ability to organise a fart in a bean factory, piss-up in a brewery, pointless demonstation in Indo...... smile


There must be something attractive about the place - you keep coming back ......
_________________________
I also made a vegetarian version,with tempe and tofu chunks for myself and others.Get over it.
Kosong.Wolo.Setunggal.Setunggal.Setunggal.Kosong.Pitu.Setunggal.Kosong.Wolo=Tempik

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#53990 - 16 Jun 07 19:49 Re: Kembali kau Flu Burung [Re: Capt. Mainwaring]
Magpie Offline
Member**

Registered: 29 Mar 06
Posts: 1306
Loc: The Toon
I never left, the place caused my inability to post for months...out of here soon tho' captain.
_________________________
"People say funny things......."

Peter Kay

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#53993 - 16 Jun 07 19:56 Re: Kembali kau Flu Burung [Re: Magpie]
Magpie Offline
Member**

Registered: 29 Mar 06
Posts: 1306
Loc: The Toon
KL to seek WHO approval to pronounce itself free of bird flu

KUALA LUMPUR (AP): Malaysia hopes to obtain the World Health Organization's approval to declare itself free of bird flu in two weeks, the health minister said, following a recent outbreak among chickens.

"We will have to apply to WHO to declare we are free of the H5N1 virus" if no new cases are reported within two weeks, Health Minister Chua Soi Lek was quoted as saying by the national news agency, Bernama, late Friday. "We can say that we arefree, but WHO has to be convinced."

One of Chua's aides confirmed the report, but declined to be identified because she could not issue public statements.

Malaysia on June 5 confirmed its first bird flu outbreak in more than a year after tests on 60 birds that died in Sungai Buloh, near the country's commercial capital, Kuala Lumpur, showed they had the virulent H5N1 virus.

Officials slaughtered about 6,000 birds in the area to contain the outbreak, which they called an isolated incident.Several villagers with flu-like symptoms were hospitalized, but they tested negative for bird flu.

Before the latest incident, Malaysia last reported an outbreak of the H5N1 strain in March 2006 in chickens in a northern village. The government had previously declared the country free of bird flu in June 2006.

Since it first hit Asian poultry stocks in 2003, bird flu has killed at least 190 people, more than 40 percent of them in Indonesia, according to the World Health Organization.
_________________________
"People say funny things......."

Peter Kay

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#62186 - 26 Sep 07 15:54 Re: Kembali kau Flu Burung [Re: Magpie]
Magpie Offline
Member**

Registered: 29 Mar 06
Posts: 1306
Loc: The Toon
Quick test for bird flu devised

Scientists in Singapore say they have created a hand-held device that can detect the deadly H5N1 bird flu virus within 30 minutes.
They say it is able to isolate, purify and amplify the viral DNA from throat swab samples and then identify it.

The hope is that the kit could help contain any outbreak much easier, as other available tests take at least several hours to produce results.

Nearly 200 people have died from the H5N1 strain worldwide.

'440% faster'

Writing in the journal Nature Medicine, the team of scientists from Singapore's Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology says the new kit will be able to test people rapidly at the point of infection or at transport centres.

They say the device is "equally sensitive and is 440% faster and 2,000-5,000% cheaper" than commercially available tests.

The so-called mini-lab will be especially useful where basic health resources are lacking, the scientists say.

They add that the prototype has delivered accurate results within 28 minutes when tested on samples of the H5N1 virus.

The virus is highly contagious to birds. Although experts say the disease cannot easily jump the species barrier, there are fears it will mutate into a virus that can be transmitted from human to human.

Story from BBC NEWS:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/1/hi/world/asia-pacific/7009750.stm
_________________________
"People say funny things......."

Peter Kay

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#63055 - 05 Oct 07 18:39 Re: Kembali kau Flu Burung [Re: Magpie]
Magpie Offline
Member**

Registered: 29 Mar 06
Posts: 1306
Loc: The Toon
Riau bird flu suspect dies
PEKANBARU (Antara): A man thought to be suffering from bird flu died at the Arifin Achmad Regional General Hospital on Friday, an official said.

"The patient was treated in an isolation ward for bird flu patients at Arifin Achmad Regional General Hospital," Burhanudin Agung of the Riau provincial health office said.

LT, 44, who lived at the Chevron Pacific Indonesia (CPI) housing complex in Rumbai, Pekanbaru, had been treated at the Awal Bros hospital for four days before he was transferred to the Arifin Achmad Hospital on Thursday when his condition deteriorated.

A hospital representative said a blood sample had been sent to the Health Ministry's laboratory in Jakarta to determine whether LT tested positive to the virus.

The hospital also sent a blood sample from another suspected bird flu patient, identified as RS, 5, from Risak Hulu in Riau Province's Kampar District, to be tested.

Riau has recorded four bird flu cases since 2005, with three casualties. Indonesia has reported the highest number of bird flu fatalities in the world, with the virus having claimed 86 lives in the country as of Monday.

http://www.thejakartapost.com/detailgeneral.asp?fileid=20071005165231&irec=1
_________________________
"People say funny things......."

Peter Kay

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#63443 - 14 Oct 07 23:17 Re: Kembali kau Flu Burung [Re: Magpie]
Magpie Offline
Member**

Registered: 29 Mar 06
Posts: 1306
Loc: The Toon
Another round of bird flu as `opor ayam' in sight
Opinion News - Thursday, October 11, 2007

Emmy Fitri, The Jakarta Post, Jakarta

Chickens are in high demand these days thanks to opor ayam -- chicken cooked in thick coconut milk and turmeric -- which is served in most households during Idul Fitri celebrations.

It's a tradition passed on from generation to generation and one that most families would refuse to give up.

At our traditional markets, or wet markets, sick or not, people are buying up chickens as fast as they can. Traders, naturally, are not eager to have officials come in and check the health of their birds. So sick and dying chicken must be immediately killed and sold, to avoid any losses.

It is easy enough to cover up a sick chicken; boil it in spices and minced turmeric. Voila! You have a nice, healthy bird ready to be fried.

There were some recent media reports of chicken traders caught in the act of using formaldehyde or injecting water into chicken carcasses to keep them "fresh".

Now many people prefer to buy live chickens, to be slaughtered at home or at the wet market, so they know they aren't getting any formaldehyde with their chicken.

Unlike backyard poultry, which have become a focus in the country's battle to prevent the spread of bird flu, wet markets remain largely ignored and untouched.

This week, city officials announced no chickens tested positive for avian influenza in Rawa Buaya, West Jakarta, where the country's 86th bird flu human fatality was recently reported. Some neighbors of the victim did have chickens, some recently purchased for Idul Fitri celebrations.

The Rawa Buaya resident, AR, did not get the virus from close contact with any sick chickens in her neighborhood, according to an official.

AR worked at a shop selling chicken meat. Interestingly, her younger sister, who worked at the same shop, died five months ago. The hospital told the family the sister died of typhus.

But what if she died from bird flu, and she was the source of the virus that killed AR?

Thankfully, that is unlikely to be the case because before AR developed respiratory problems, her work at the Rawa Buaya market included killing, plucking and cleaning chickens.

Details on which chickens she handled, were they sick and who bought them would have to be painstakingly pieced together to get an idea of how one could get this horrid disease which kills in a matter of days.

Each case of human infection of bird flu offers precious information on how to help others avoid the same fate.

The Rawa Buaya case only confirms that live chickens are still sold at Jakarta's traditional markets, despite an ordinance issued earlier this year banning the practice.

Campaigns warning people of the danger of treating chickens as members of the family or displaying them in market stalls to attract shoppers obviously failed.

Those of us who do not share a bed with chickens or have emotional or physical bonds with the birds can, for the time being, remain calm because so far humans can only get the virus from close contact with sick chickens.

But things will definitely change if the virus mutates to a form that can easily jump from human to human. A cough or sneeze from an infected person in a packed bus, airplane, elevator or shopping mall could transmit the virus to dozens, hundreds or thousands of other people.

Back to current reality, in the wake of the bird flu outbreaks in the capital and elsewhere in the country, officials have used the media to ask residents not to keep chickens in their yards.

There have also been the usual promises to tighten controls over small, medium and big poultry companies, and to intensify public health campaigns.

It won't last long, if it ever lasted at all. Chickens can still be seen roaming around Jakarta's housing areas, sometimes even getting as far as business districts. Another common sight on the city's busy streets is of live chickens packed inside plastic crates on motorcycles, pushcarts or trucks.

A gubernatorial decree issued in January makes keeping chickens in the backyard a crime, though no punishments are stipulated.

The decree also clearly stipulates the city will restrict the sale of live chickens in markets, thus the city would have to regulate the poultry industry and slaughterhouses accordingly.

Former governor Sutiyoso may earn praise for initiating the decree, but he deserves scorn for not ensuring its enforcement.

The decree, issued after three Jakartans were confirmed to have died from bird flu in December and January, cannot stand alone. No, a whole host of follow-up measures are needed.

The key to warding off any preventable disease, not only bird flu but also longtime scourge dengue fever, is to change the behavior of the public and officials. As usual, change is only made after trouble hits home.

But when trouble does hit home and there is growing demand for more hygienic facilities, including regulated slaughterhouses and better control of chicken sales in markets, will the government be ready?

Jakarta will be unable to handle this alone. The unregulated distribution and sale of chickens, and the numerous traditional markets throughout the capital that provide vital jobs for thousands of people, will not easily give way to more ordered and modern facilities.

Against this backdrop of messy traditional markets and unresponsive city officials, the Idul Fitri holiday nears and with it a spike in chicken consumption.

Unless something is done with our wet markets, God forbid, we can expect more outbreaks of bird flu while we're savoring our opor ayam.
_________________________
"People say funny things......."

Peter Kay

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#68118 - 14 Jan 08 21:04 Re: Kembali kau Flu Burung [Re: Magpie]
Magpie Offline
Member**

Registered: 29 Mar 06
Posts: 1306
Loc: The Toon
Bird flu kills Indonesian woman, raising country's toll to 95
JAKARTA (AP): A 32-year-old Indonesian woman died from bird flu at her home after refusing to see a doctor, the Health Ministry said Monday, raising the country's death toll from the disease to 95.

Two laboratory tests confirmed she was infected with the H5N1 strain of the virus, said Joko Suyono, an official at the Bird Flu Information Center.

The woman from the western outskirts of the capital, Jakarta, came down with severe pneumonia and died shortly after going to a hospital Thursday, he said

http://www.thejakartapost.com/detailgeneral.asp?fileid=20080114161948&irec=0
_________________________
"People say funny things......."

Peter Kay

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#68119 - 14 Jan 08 21:11 Re: Kembali kau Flu Burung [Re: Magpie]
Magpie Offline
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New bird flu patient admitted to hospital

JAKARTA: A 16-year-old patient suffering from bird flu has been admitted to Persahabatan Hospital in Rawamangun, East Jakarta.

The senior high school student, identified only as YF, was referred from Mitra Keluarga Hospital in Bekasi and admitted Thursday at 12:30 p.m.

The head the hospital's bird flu anticipation division, Mukhtar Ikhsan, said the patient's condition was bad.

"The patient has suffered acute pneumonia," he said as quoted by tempointeraktif.com.

A doctor from the division, Erlina Burhan, said the patient's lungs were being treated with a ventilator.

"The lungs can absorb oxygen up to 90 percent," she said.

YF is the first patient treated for bird flu at the hospital this year. The hospital has treated as many as 14 bird flu patients with 12 deaths. -- JP
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#68764 - 24 Jan 08 20:37 Re: Kembali kau Flu Burung [Re: Magpie]
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Experts probe high bird flu mortality rate in Indonesia
Thu 24 Jan 2008, 13:15 GMT

[-] Text [+]By Tan Ee Lyn

BANGKOK, Jan 24 (Reuters) - Medical experts are worried about how death rates for H5N1 bird flu have shot up in places like Indonesia, and studies are being carried out to see if victims require higher dosages of drugs.

Although the H5N1 has only infected 352 people since 2003, it has killed 219 of them, with mortality rates rising to more than 80 percent in places like Indonesia in the past two years.

"It could be they are treated later, or the virus is different, more virulent. There are many maybes, including differences in susceptibility of the virus," Menno de Jong, a doctor who has treated bird flu victims in Vietnam, told Reuters on the sidelines of a bird flu conference in Bangkok.

He said a major concern was the H5N1 variant in Indonesia appeared to be less susceptible to oseltamivir, the antiviral used to combat the disease.

"It's not a (drug) resistant virus, it's just that a bit more drug (may be) needed to inhibit these (H5N1) clade 2 viruses," he said, referring to the sub-category that Indonesia's H5N1 virus has been classified under.

Studies are being conducted in Thailand, Vietnam and Indonesia to see if H5N1 patients need to be given higher dosages of oseltamivir.

Indonesia is the worst hit of the 14 countries where H5N1 has infected people since 2003. On Thursday, a 30-year-old man became 98th Indonesian fatality from the disease, the health ministry said.

Although bird flu remains an animal disease, experts fear the virus could mutate into a form easily passed from human to human and kill millions.

But details emerged on Thursday on how the virus had been passed from mother to foetus in the case of a pregnant 24-year-old Chinese woman who died of the disease in 2005.

Jiang Gu, a leading scientist at Beijing University, said the virus was detected in most organs of the foetus, including the brain.

"It is capable of penetrating the placental barrier and infecting the foetus. (This is the) first evidence of such human-to-human transmission," Gu said. (Editing by Jeremy Laurence)

Reuters 2008.
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#69014 - 30 Jan 08 00:06 Re: Kembali kau Flu Burung [Re: Magpie]
Magpie Offline
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Indonesia bird flu deaths reach 100
Indonesia has been hit the hardest
by the H5N1 bird flu virus [EPA]

Indonesia has reported two more deaths related to the bird flu virus, raising the country's death toll from the disease to 100, health officials said.

A statement from the country's bird flu information centre said the two latest fatalities included a 23-year-old woman and a nine-year-old boy, both of whom lived outside the capital, Jakarta.





Indonesia, the nation hardest hit by bird flu, has recorded nearly half the 222 human deaths worldwide since the virus began decimating poultry stocks in Asia in late 2003.



Joko Suyono, of Indonesia's National Bird Flu Center, said both the latest victims had tested positive for the virus.







He added that two other Indonesians in their 30s, who also tested positive for the H5N1 virus, were being treated in the capital.

Suyono said there were no obvious explanations for the sudden surge of cases.

"We need to carry more tests and investigation first to be really sure," he told reporters.

It is not clear how the deceased boy, who was treated in different hospitals for two weeks, had contracted the disease.

The woman is thought to have contracted the disease from fowl kept at a poultry slaughterhouse near her home.

Contact with sick fowl is the most common way of being infected by the virus which is endemic in bird populations in most parts of Indonesia where humans and poultry live in close proximity.

Although bird flu remains an animal disease, experts fear the virus could mutate into a form easily passed from human to human and spark a global epidemic.



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#69112 - 01 Feb 08 07:32 Re: Kembali kau Flu Burung [Re: Magpie]
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http://www.radioaustralia.net.au/news/stories/s2151029.htm

Indonesia has launched a new three-year plan to fight bird flu, just days after the confirmed death toll climbed above100 in the country hardest hit by the H5-N1 virus.

The plan will be funded by a $US20 million dollar grant from the European Union.

That will be channelled through the World Health Organisation.

The WHO's Indonesia representative, Subhash Salunke, says the strategy will focus on preventing new infections, better monitoring of the spread of the virus and continued scientific research.

He says prevention of new cases remains an urgent priority, while improving survival of those infected is another major priority.

Indonesia accounts for just under half of the 224 human bird flu deaths worldwide, according to WHO figures.

The 100th victim died on Sunday, and the 101st fatality was recorded on Tuesday.
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#69113 - 01 Feb 08 07:54 Re: Kembali kau Flu Burung [Re: Magpie]
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This brings to mind a chicken version of Watership Down with all the chickens to escape while there charges are too busy attending a funeral, smiling it up in villages for the popular vote, or muscling back and forth for position. And will this 20 million all be spent on solving the problem. I believe not.
Have a look at this link.

http://gamapserver.who.int/mapLibrary/Files/Maps/Global_H5N1inHumanCUMULATIVE_FIMS_20080121.png

Vietnam has had a lot of cases, but has a much lower death toll. Wonder what the stats are telling us, aside from the fact Indonesia is top cock at the moment.
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#69117 - 01 Feb 08 08:01 Re: Kembali kau Flu Burung [Re: Magpie]
Dilli Offline
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Registered: 26 Feb 06
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For US$ 20 Million do you think they will start sharing the Virus with other researchers?

If it is a Maggers reports 20 Million Sterling, where has the rest of the money gone?
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#69118 - 01 Feb 08 08:03 Re: Kembali kau Flu Burung [Re: Dilli]
KuKuKaChu Moderator Offline
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Registered: 09 Oct 05
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they b
Quoting: Dilli
If it is a Maggers reports 20 Million Sterling, where has the rest of the money gone?

they bought some petri dishes, a packet of agar-agar, an incubator, and an expensive microscope from toys-r-us.
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