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#29101 - 21 Mar 06 13:55 Australian intervention?
Polar Bear Offline
Pujangga Besar

Registered: 23 Nov 05
Posts: 6177
Indon spy chief accuses Aussie group
By Rob Taylor in Jakarta
March 21, 2006
INDONESIA'S intelligence chief has accused an Australian-backed aid group of being behind clashes in the province of West Papua in which four security officers were killed.

Major-General Syamsir Siregar, who heads the Indonesian State Intelligence Agency, or BIN, refused to name the organisation which he believed fomented last week's protests against the huge US-owned Freeport gold and copper mine.

Three policemen and an air force officer were killed in the riots.

But General Siregar said the aid organisation operated in Papua and had close ties with an outside country, which Indonesian newspapers said was Australia.

"There was an NGO (non-government organisation) sponsoring it all," he said according to Koran Tempo newspaper.

"As far as I know, the mover was a local NGO, but had connections with the outside.

"I guess you all know (who)."

Indonesia has previously accused several Australian aid groups of secretly backing the independence aims of West Papuan separatists, who have for decades waged a low-level insurgency against Jakarta rule.

The aid arm of the Australian union movement, Union Aid Abroad-APHEDA, has come in for particular criticism for circulating communiques from the separatist Papuan Council Presidium to activists in Australia.

Many influential Indonesians believe Canberra secretly backs independence for West Papua and hopes for an East Timor-style separation.

In a 2003 meeting with Prime Minister John Howard, former Indonesian president Megawati Sukarnoputri said she was concerned Australian government aid funds were being used indirectly to support separatist movements in Indonesia.

The executive director of APHEDA, Peter Jennings, said the agency had no projects in Papua.

But he believed the West Papuan people had been denied their rights in a 1969 UN integration referendum widely regarded as a sham.

"The bottom line is the people of West Papua are entitled to another UN-sponsored referendum on their future," he told AAP.

The Australian Government's aid wing, Ausaid, warns NGOs it will not approve funding for projects which "subsidise evangelism or missionary outreach, or similar activities by partisan political organisations".

It also warns it will not support independence movements.

In February, Foreign Minister Alexander Downer assured Jakarta that Australia believed West Papua should remain a part of Indonesia.

That assurance was given after 43 West Papuans landed in Australia's north seeking asylum.

Following last week's clash in West Papua's provincial capital, Jayapura, police have arrested 14 people and questioned more than 70 students on charges ranging from destruction of property to assault and murder.

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#29102 - 21 Mar 06 14:02 Re: Australian intervention?
KuKuKaChu Moderator Offline
Pooh Bah

Registered: 09 Oct 05
Posts: 10790
Loc: Centre of the Universe
same old story: it's everyone's fault except ours!

the australian govt (among others) have been telling the indonesians for years: fix it, or you'll lose it.

most western governments want papua to remain part of indonesia, but they also recognise that if the indonesians are incapable of handling it then they should withdraw and allow independence.
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#29103 - 21 Mar 06 15:11 Re: Australian intervention?
Polar Bear Offline
Pujangga Besar

Registered: 23 Nov 05
Posts: 6177
It is a difficult situation, and reinforces my idea that if Indonesia goes hard line Islamic, a lot of countries will assist some parts of it to gain independance.

For the record - i thought (and still think) that East timor is far too small an economy to survive as an independant state. This is being demostrated. Even with huge oil susbisdies ET is struggling. Most of its army walked off the other day because it isnt being paid.

to give independance to WP is another crazy move.

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#29104 - 21 Mar 06 15:21 Re: Australian intervention?
g00f13 Offline
Member*

Registered: 12 Nov 05
Posts: 739
Loc: earth
WP is a resource rich area much like PNG, the factional nature of the area is also much like PNG. I tend to agree with PB that for it to become independent it may not be able to sustain it in the long run.

On the other hand, Indo is really struggling to maintain the country territorial integrity without a strong defence force and defence machinery.

I think the defence force is concentrating its effort on the political front rather than being a true defence force.

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#29105 - 21 Mar 06 16:09 Re: Australian intervention?
Polar Bear Offline
Pujangga Besar

Registered: 23 Nov 05
Posts: 6177
I think sometimes it is better for smaller countries to align themselves with larger ones.

East Timor was far better off with Indonesia as a "big brother" than standing alone.

Australian support for an independant ET was driven by the Catholic Church, and the idea that Australia would grab a lot of free oil revenue....

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#29106 - 22 Mar 06 09:08 Re: Australian intervention?
KuKuKaChu Moderator Offline
Pooh Bah

Registered: 09 Oct 05
Posts: 10790
Loc: Centre of the Universe
economically, in terms of resources at least, Papua is far more viable that East Timor would ever be. however, in terms of political maturity and readiness to govern, you just have to look over the border at PNG. not a good scenario. but then, if jakarta doesn't get its act together and start governing properly in papua instead of treating it like a milch cow, then papuans will feel they have no other choice but to pull out of the republic, ready or not.
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#29107 - 22 Mar 06 10:02 Re: Australian intervention?
Polar Bear Offline
Pujangga Besar

Registered: 23 Nov 05
Posts: 6177
ET has a lot of oil...

but i agree, a stable country is not a case of "add money and stir".

I think WP is better off under Indonesian control.......

BUT - if Indonesia moves to fundamental Islam (as appears to be happening) then a lot of people will agitate, for various reasons, for independence for many of its states.

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#29108 - 22 Mar 06 10:21 Re: Australian intervention?
lucille_ball Offline
Member+

Registered: 02 Feb 06
Posts: 38
Loc: Jakarta
Quote:
Originally posted by KuKuKaChu:
economically, in terms of resources at least, Papua is far more viable that East Timor would ever be. however, in terms of political maturity and readiness to govern, you just have to look over the border at PNG. not a good scenario. but then, if jakarta doesn't get its act together and start governing properly in papua instead of treating it like a milch cow, then papuans will feel they have no other choice but to pull out of the republic, ready or not.
I agree. i think Indonesia should start to get its act together in form of action not just persuade talking which nowadays people are getting sick of it, especially the papuans. I think what they need more is safety in order to establish stability and of course prosperity wink

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#29109 - 22 Mar 06 10:25 Re: Australian intervention?
Polar Bear Offline
Pujangga Besar

Registered: 23 Nov 05
Posts: 6177
I suspect it is (as always) trouble inspired by outside influences.

Look who gained from East Timor:

The Catholic Church..... (No Islamic interference in Catholic teachings)

The Australian government.... (half the oil rights)

now look who instigated the trouble - the Catholic Church and the Australian government.

Look at who will gain, and you will see who is behind it all.

One thing is certain - the WP Students are too stupid to think this one up for themselves.....

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#29110 - 22 Mar 06 10:26 Re: Australian intervention?
Polar Bear Offline
Pujangga Besar

Registered: 23 Nov 05
Posts: 6177
And $50 says within 5 years there is a "Free Bali" movement.....

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#29111 - 22 Mar 06 17:45 Re: Australian intervention?
Jokie Jokie Girl Offline
Pujangga

Registered: 07 Nov 05
Posts: 2552
Loc: Central Jakarta
aku bingung..apa yang musti aku post di sini...but clearly..I know what happened in Papua..but I didn't followed the development that happened in papua...
.
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#29112 - 22 Mar 06 17:53 Re: Australian intervention?
Polar Bear Offline
Pujangga Besar

Registered: 23 Nov 05
Posts: 6177
you have to ask yourself.....

Are the people of East Timor any better off today than they would have been under Indonesian control..... ?

According to Helen Hill of University of Victoria in Melbourne, East Timorese negotiators are also unhappy with the so-called Greater Sunrise Utilisation Agreement which gives Australia 82% of the revenues from one of the biggest oilfields while east Timor, far closer to Sunrise, gets only 18%. So far, Australia has siphoned between $2 to $4 billion in tax revenues and continue to delay the negotiation long enough to enable it to bleed East Timor to death.

At the same time, the Australian Government continues to announce different estimates for gas and oil royalties to East Timor in an effort to induce East Timor to accept a once-off payment of say 10-20 billion dollars and give up its claims on the resources for at least for 50-100 years. However, the Timor Sea Justice Campaign accused the Australian of unfairness and providing a “shoddy deal” to East Timor.

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#29113 - 22 Mar 06 17:57 Re: Australian intervention?
Polar Bear Offline
Pujangga Besar

Registered: 23 Nov 05
Posts: 6177
Wooops

The above was updated late last year with a 50/50 split on oil revenue, despite 80% of the oil field being in Timorese waters.....

So Australia did very nicely out of it....

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#29114 - 22 Mar 06 18:18 Re: Australian intervention?
Jokie Jokie Girl Offline
Pujangga

Registered: 07 Nov 05
Posts: 2552
Loc: Central Jakarta
Quote:
Originally posted by Polar Bear:
you have to ask yourself.....

Are the people of East Timor any better off today than they would have been under Indonesian control..... ?

According to Helen Hill of University of Victoria in Melbourne, East Timorese negotiators are also unhappy with the so-called Greater Sunrise Utilisation Agreement which gives Australia 82% of the revenues from one of the biggest oilfields while east Timor, far closer to Sunrise, gets only 18%. So far, Australia has siphoned between $2 to $4 billion in tax revenues and continue to delay the negotiation long enough to enable it to bleed East Timor to death.

At the same time, the Australian Government continues to announce different estimates for gas and oil royalties to East Timor in an effort to induce East Timor to accept a once-off payment of say 10-20 billion dollars and give up its claims on the resources for at least for 50-100 years. However, the Timor Sea Justice Campaign accused the Australian of unfairness and providing a “shoddy deal” to East Timor.
"Are the people of East Timor any better off today than they would have been under Indonesian control..... ?"

I'm not sure about that...but that doesn't meant that I'm not sensitive with their probs...

yeah..I know that sometimes The government of the centre didn't care about what happened in the territory, including papua...
so I think it's rational if a lots of provincies in Indonesia,Want to isolated from Indonesia and established the country personally like East Timor..
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#29115 - 22 Mar 06 19:30 Re: Australian intervention?
Polar Bear Offline
Pujangga Besar

Registered: 23 Nov 05
Posts: 6177
It was a rhetorical question - a statement that is made to look like a question.

I meant that the poeple are no better off today.

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#29116 - 23 Mar 06 14:32 Re: Australian intervention?
lucille_ball Offline
Member+

Registered: 02 Feb 06
Posts: 38
Loc: Jakarta
I think the government should raise their awareness in terms of Indonesia's natural resources. They have to realized that Indonesia is a big country which consist of many islands and they should know how to maintain it so that they won't build "separatist movement" because if so the loss stil brings the disadvantage to its citizen, whether they stay in Indonesia Republic or decided to establish a new country under others influence, just like what happen recently in papua wink

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#29117 - 23 Mar 06 17:34 Re: Australian intervention?
Ena Offline
Member*

Registered: 26 Nov 05
Posts: 765
Loc: Sydney
Hmm Just saw an article about merbau wood being very freely available in us and canada but no one can remember where they got the supply from other than " papua somewhere"
This illegal deforesting makes me worried, no wonder people get landslided.
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#29118 - 23 Mar 06 17:37 Re: Australian intervention?
KuKuKaChu Moderator Offline
Pooh Bah

Registered: 09 Oct 05
Posts: 10790
Loc: Centre of the Universe
there's just been a landslide at the freeport mine; three dead. perhaps this is karma?
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#29119 - 23 Mar 06 17:58 Re: Australian intervention?
cherry Offline
Member**

Registered: 08 Nov 05
Posts: 1055
Loc: Indonesia
Quote:
Originally posted by lucille_ball:
I think the government should raise their awareness in terms of Indonesia's natural resources. They have to realized that Indonesia is a big country which consist of many islands and they should know how to maintain it so that they won't build "separatist movement" because if so the loss stil brings the disadvantage to its citizen, whether they stay in Indonesia Republic or decided to establish a new country under others influence, just like what happen recently in papua wink
Occasionally the government too egoistic..
And only considered the government of the centre important..And did not care about the other province..
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#29120 - 25 Mar 06 22:51 Re: Australian intervention?
Polar Bear Offline
Pujangga Besar

Registered: 23 Nov 05
Posts: 6177
Its not just the indonesian government, ALL bloody governments are like that.

We have a bunch of assholes who never leave Canberra, a city full of public servants. Australian politicians NEVER know what the real Australia is like (and dont care)

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#29121 - 03 Apr 06 08:48 Re: Australian intervention?
KuKuKaChu Moderator Offline
Pooh Bah

Registered: 09 Oct 05
Posts: 10790
Loc: Centre of the Universe
ANTARA
Apr 03 00:39
Controversial Caricature reflects true attitude of Australian nation


Solo, C Java (Antara News) - The publication of a caricature which defamed President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono and carried by The Weekend Australian daily is a reflection of the general attitude of the Australian people, a legislator said.

A member of the House`s Commission I dealing with foreign affairs, Slamet Effendi Yusuf said here on Sunday he strongly deplored offensive caricature.

"We have to exercise more caution with the Australian attitude, as a similar case had happened with regard to East Timorese in the past," he said.

Effendi further said that as a matter of fact the cartoon is a reflection of Australian belief that Indonesia has been treating the Papuans unfairly.

The question now is whether freedom of expression also means freedom to denounce or discredit other people and ignore the rights of other people, he said.

"As leader of a big country, President Yudhoyono must have the guts to put up resistance to the Australian newspaper by suing it for defamation," said Effendi, who is deputy chairman of the National Awakening Party (PKB) faction in the House.

Effendi made the statement after The Weekend Australian carried on Saturday a cartoon depicting a man wearing a rimless black cap, having a tail and riding on a black man resembling a Papuan. The cartoon showed that the man told the Papuan, "Don`t take this the wrong way..."

The cartoon was made by Australian cartoonist Bill Leake.

Effendi said the Indonesian government seemed powerless in facing problems caused by the developed countries like the United States, the United Kingdom and Australia.

"In fact, Indonesia is the world`s fourth largest country which has abundant natural resources but unfortunately, our country`s leaders including career diplomats are powerless in facing maneuvers of other countries," he said.

He said President Yudhoyono can sue the Australian daily through an international tribunal.

The Australian cartoon was similar to one drawn by Indonesia`s Rakyat Merdeka newspaper issued on March 27 which depicted Australian Prime Minister John Howard riding a man probably Australian Foreign Minister Alexander Downer.

The cartoon showed that Howard told Downer, "I want Papua! Alex, try to play it."

The Indonesian newspaper published the cartoon to protest the Australian government`s decision to grant asylum to 42 Papuans.

Effendi said the Australian move to grant asylum and issuing a travel warning for Indonesia and the publication of President Yudhoyono`s cartoon by the Australian newspaper were too much out of the line. (*)
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#29122 - 03 Apr 06 08:53 Re: Australian intervention?
KuKuKaChu Moderator Offline
Pooh Bah

Registered: 09 Oct 05
Posts: 10790
Loc: Centre of the Universe
For those who haven't seen it, here's the cartoon:

http://www.sploid.com/news/2006/04/another_dumb_ca.php
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#29123 - 03 Apr 06 12:00 Re: Australian intervention?
KuKuKaChu Moderator Offline
Pooh Bah

Registered: 09 Oct 05
Posts: 10790
Loc: Centre of the Universe
From The Jakarta Post

Looking at the asylum issue in retrospect

Todung Mulya Lubis, Jakarta

The fuss about the temporary visas granted to 42 Papuans seeking political asylum in Australia should have stopped by now. Two weeks of wrath is enough and it is now time for everyone to think clearly about this matter. The granting of asylum (the Papuans have not received formal asylum) is quite common in relations between states. International laws and practices also allow this to take place.

During the years following the fall of Sukarno's administration and the collapse of the Indonesian Communist Party, asylum was granted repeatedly. Many Indonesian citizens obtained asylum from various Eastern European countries and from China. Then the in early 1980s, a number of Acehnese also went to Scandinavian countries to seek political asylum.

Obtaining asylum is an inherent right of all humans when facing state-sanctioned political persecution (Article 14 of the United Nations' Universal Declaration of Human Rights).

Political asylum is, indeed, not provided for in any of the articles in our amended 1945 Constitution. However, Article 28 of the 1999 Human Rights Law strongly recognizes the right of a citizen to obtain a political asylum from another country. Therefore obtaining political asylum is recognized as a legal right.

The question now is whether those applying for political asylum are subject to political persecution perpetrated by Indonesian government apparatuses. We must first examine all the available information; if it is found that the applicants are not political victims or political fugitives, the government can always send a note of protest.

Here, however, lies a difference in interpretation that is difficult to bridge. Usually the final word rests with the country to which a request for political asylum is submitted. If the Australian government, through its immigration department, is of the opinion that there is strong legal reason to believe that these 42 Papuans will face political persecution in Indonesia, the granting of the visas, with the possibility of asylum in the future, is justifiable in the light of international law.

The Indonesian government may feel disappointed and infuriated. The House of Representatives may be enraged. However, calling for diplomatic ties to be severed is just grandstanding and will bring no benefit. The relationship between Indonesia and Australia is one with its ups and downs, laden with political, economic and cultural burdens.

Like it or not, Indonesia and Australia have an interdependence. Look at the balance of trade between the two countries. Our exports and imports are quite substantial. In 2005, our total exports to Australia were US$2.2 billion, while imports from Australia stood at $2.6 billion. The same year also saw a significant amount of Australian investment in Indonesia. Our challenge is how to promote this trade and invite more Australian investment.

There are many other things to be improved in the relationship between Indonesia and Australia. The arrival of Australian tourists in Indonesia, particularly in Bali, for example, greatly contributes to Indonesia's tourist sector. Australia is also where many Indonesians pursue their studies. Clearly, what is at stake is not insignificant when we allow our diplomatic relations with Australia to worsen.

However, we certainly must act with greater wisdom to enable prudent political and economic calculations. We must not allow ourselves to slip. In the case of East Timor, when the Australian government was believed to have "stabbed Indonesia in the back", the government was able to keep its anger in check. The government should now be able to do likewise.

One important question that we must pose is what is really happening in Papua and what must be done to resolve the problems there. To say that everything is all right in Papua is tantamount to lying to yourself. The recent violence in Papua has not only been related to PT Freeport Indonesia, although the popular demand that locals should also enjoy part of Freeport's wealth is not unfounded.

If Papuans demand that Freeport give them a bigger share of revenue, this must be given due attention. The government must undertake an audit to ensure that Papuans really enjoy part of their own riches, because all these years very little of the portion set aside for Papua from Freeport's mining operation has reportedly reached Papuans, especially those living around the mining area. Where have the funds allocated by Freeport gone? In any case, the rights of Papuans should not be curtailed or corrupted, either by the political elite in Papua or in Jakarta.

Injustices in Papua go beyond the Freeport issue. It is not a secret that resource-rich Papua has been a target of looting on a massive scale by both businesspeople and the powers that be. It is easy to see the disappearance of formerly dense jungles in the province.

Papuans seem to have been drugged in such a way that they have become voiceless, unable to demand that their social and political rights are honored. The policy of repression enforced in the province gives little room for democracy, although the whole country is now starting to practice democracy.

The law on special autonomy for Papua, which is actually quite broad-based, has yet to be fully exercised because the political elite are still worried that full exercise of this autonomy will only reinforce the sentiment of separatism in Papua.

The long history of desire for freedom cannot just be ignored, and postponing the exercise of autonomy will only strengthen the network of separatism in the community. This is the dilemma that we must deal with, especially given the many parties in international political networks that encourage the secession of Papua from Indonesia.

Here lies the challenge facing us all. The international community has reiterated that it recognizes the territorial integrity of Indonesia, as echoed by John Howard, the Australian prime minister. So with that guarantee, couldn't we all join forces to build autonomy in Papua in a spirit of democracy that would kindle hopes for justice?

Otherwise we will continue to see groups of Papuans sailing to Australia seeking asylum.

<i>The writer is chairman of the founding board of Imparsial, the Indonesian Human Rights Monitor. He can be reached at mulya@cbn.net.id.
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#29124 - 03 Apr 06 14:44 Re: Australian intervention?
klicker Offline
Member+

Registered: 08 Feb 06
Posts: 79
Loc: Sydney Australia
I think Australian doing this only for humanitarian purpose to protected life from being punished for wrong doing with foreign country. the purpose only to protected life nothing more ,than that which indonesian dont take any asylum seeker who is in need to stay away from punishment, they will received back their home land. The Indonesian Law is not aplicable.

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#29125 - 04 Apr 06 12:05 Re: Australian intervention?
KuKuKaChu Moderator Offline
Pooh Bah

Registered: 09 Oct 05
Posts: 10790
Loc: Centre of the Universe
Tempo Interactive

DPR Members to Meet Papuans in Australia
Monday, 03 April, 2006 | 17:23 WIB

Tempo Interactive, Jakarta: Six members of the Indonesian House of Representatives (DPR) from the Foreign Affairs Commission plan to visit Canberra, Australia, at their own expense.

The six include Yuddy Chrisnandi and Happy Bone Zulkarnaen from the Golkar Party, Jeffrey J. Massie (Peace & Prosperity Party- PDS), Ali Mochtar Ngabalin (Crescent Star Party-PBB), Dedi Djamaluddin Malik, (National Mandate Party) and Effendi M.S. Simbolon (Indonesian Democratic Party of Struggle-PDIP).

While there, according to Effendi, they will meet members of the Australian parliament and government as well as the 42 Papuans who have been granted asylum on grounds of genocide threats.

“We will provide evidence that their accusations are not true,” Effendi told Tempo yesterday (2/4).

The evidence to be shown, he said, consists of primary data from the State Intelligence Agency (BIN), the Police, the Indonesian Military (TNI), and churches in Papua.

The evidence shows that the 42 Papuans are from various ethnical groups, and their departure to Australia was a manipulation assisted by Australia.

It is planned that this week the delegation will meet the DPR Speaker, Agung Laksono, to request permission for the trip.

According to Ali Mochtar, the Australian parliament will provide an informal explanation by facsimile or phone on Wednesday this week and this will be delivered to DPR leaders.

The delegation will ask for the DPR leaders’ recommendation to visit Canberra.

It also plans to bring charges against the Australian Immigration Minister for granting the visas at the international arbitration agency.

Wahyudin Fahmi
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