Forums and Chat for Indonesia's English-speaking community
Page 4 of 4 < 1 2 3 4
Topic Options
Rate This Topic
#30891 - 01 Jun 06 18:32 Re: Yogyakarta Earthquake
Jokie Jokie Girl Offline
Pujangga

Registered: 07 Nov 05
Posts: 2552
Loc: Central Jakarta
yeah you're rite rsi, have you any plan go yogya?
maybe they need your support..at least doa from you..
me and my self, I have nothing to do.. I only give much doa for them, hope they still sober and patient smile
_________________________
"I am the Island girl, born with the humble life, eat on the floor with the right hand"

Top
#30892 - 02 Jun 06 04:11 Re: Yogyakarta Earthquake
Magpie Offline
Member**

Registered: 29 Mar 06
Posts: 1306
Loc: The Toon
Java quake death toll increases

The number of people killed in the earthquake which hit the island of Java on Saturday has increased to more than 6,200, Indonesian authorities say.
At least 30,000 people have been injured and more than 105,000 homes destroyed or damaged, leaving hundreds of thousands of people displaced.

However, authorities say they expect the figures to rise as further damage assessment is carried out.

The UN says aid is now getting through to most areas.

But a UN official said hospitals were struggling to cope with the numbers of injured.

"Most of the hospitals are functioning, but are overloaded. There is a lack of space in the hospitals," Charlie Higgins, the UN's humanitarian co-ordinator in Yogyakarta, the city worst affected by the disaster, told AFP news agency.

"It's getting out the basic medical supplies to the hospitals that is important," he said.

Aid efforts

As hospitals remain overcrowded and delivery of aid has been hampered by bad weather, some locals have been forced to spend a fifth night without shelter.

A field hospital set up by the US in Sewon, south of Yogyakarta, is expected to become fully operational on Thursday.

The UN's top humanitarian co-ordinator, Jan Egeland, was optimistic about the aid effort.

"Of course there are villages and people who have not yet got assistance because there are hundreds of thousands of severely affected people in a big area and we're less than a week into the emergency."

"I think the Indonesia system works. It has been working very well," he said.

President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono, who spent four days in the region, said he had enough confidence in the relief efforts to return to the capital, Jakarta.

The 6.3 magnitude quake hit the ancient city of Yogyakarta early on Saturday.

The region is close to the volcano Mount Merapi which has been spewing lava and ash for some weeks.

The Asian Development Bank has promised $60m (32m) in aid and loans to help the affected region.

The Indonesian government has pledged an initial 12kg of rice per family, and 200,000 rupiah ($21) for each survivor to cover clothing and household goods, and compensation for damaged houses.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/5035904.stm
_________________________
"People say funny things......."

Peter Kay

Top
#30893 - 06 Jun 06 04:06 Re: Yogyakarta Earthquake
Magpie Offline
Member**

Registered: 29 Mar 06
Posts: 1306
Loc: The Toon
UN plans six-month quake relief

Indonesia's earthquake survivors will need a six-month relief operation costing more than $100m, UN officials have said.
Georg Peterson, from the WHO, said the challenge in the short term was to get people out of crowded hospitals to prevent the spread of infection.

Friday prayers were held in the area for the first time since the quake hit, killing at least 6,200 people.

Many Javanese believe last Saturday's disaster was a warning from God.


"The height of the emergency phase will continue, I would expect, for another week to two weeks, and at the most be completed in a month," Charlie Higgins, UN aid co-ordinator in the area, told a news conference.

"The area, although not large, is constricted and there are many difficulties in moving relief to difficult areas," he said.

But an estimated $100m ($78m) will be needed over the next six months, and nearly half of that money should go toward housing, according to the UN Office for the Co-ordination of Humanitarian Affairs.


Religion plays an important role in many locals' lives

Thousands of local Muslims attended prayers on Friday.

In the village of Giwangan, on the southern outskirts of Yogyakarta, a special prayer leaflet was distributed entitled "Disaster and How to Face It", quoting a passage from the Koran saying natural disasters were God's will.

"We want to make peace inside by praying and being closer to God," local merchant Iskak, 40, told the French news agency AFP.

"The earthquake is because God would like to give a warning to people, that it is the fault of humankind."


Sukasdi, a 51-year-old police officer, said his survival had strengthened his faith.

"I feel that my life is more valuable because my life has been given to me by God. I feel much closer to God and I can face the situation in a more peaceful way," he said.

At least 30,000 people were injured and more than 105,000 homes destroyed or damaged by the quake, leaving hundreds of thousands of people displaced.

Mr Peterson, from the World Health Organization, said that many of those who had died in recent days were elderly people who had suffered complications from their injuries or infections of their wounds.

The 6.3 magnitude quake hit the ancient city of Yogyakarta early on Saturday.

The region is close to the volcano Mount Merapi which has been spewing lava and ash for some weeks

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/5040170.stm
_________________________
"People say funny things......."

Peter Kay

Top
#30894 - 06 Jun 06 12:10 Re: Yogyakarta Earthquake
Magpie Offline
Member**

Registered: 29 Mar 06
Posts: 1306
Loc: The Toon
Indonesia plans massive immunizations in earthquake zone

BANTUL, Yogyakarta (AP) Indonesia prepared Tuesday to immunize tens of thousands of earthquake survivors against tetanus and measles, as a nearby volcano sent out fresh clouds of searing hot gas clouds and lava streams.

The Mount Merapi volcano added concerns in the area of central Java hardest hit by the 5.9 magnitude earthquake, which killed at least 5, 857 people and injured more than 30,000.

Activity at the mountain, which has a history of deadly explosions, increased after the quake, the latest in a string of natural disasters to hit the world's fourth most populous nation in recent years.

Health workers are concerned that the estimated 647,000 people displaced by the May 27 quake -- a third of whom are living in makeshift shelters with no toilets or running water -- are vulnerable to disease.

On Wednesday, the government and the World Health Organization were to begin immunizing all children under 5 in the quake zone against measles, said Harsaran Pandey, a WHO spokeswoman.

All adults in the quake zone would also receive a booster dose of tetanus vaccine, she said.

"There are lots of nails poking around that people can be cut on," she said.

Tetanus is an infection that usually originates from a contaminated wound, often a cut or deep puncture wound. It is fatal in more than 30 percent of cases, with even higher rates in the developing world.

Pandey said there had already been one suspected case of the disease.

On Monday, some 200 trucks, each filled with 4,000 kilograms of rice destined for the disaster zone, left the city square in the ancient royal capital of Yogyakarta.

"The government will ensure everybody gets food," said Vice President Jusuf Kalla, promising 10 kilograms of rice per person each month until survivors' houses were rebuilt.

The international relief effort has picked up pace in recent days, although aid has yet to reach some remote areas. The United Nations has appealed for US$103 million for recovery efforts over the next six months.

Indonesia is prone to seismic upheaval because of its location on the so-called Pacific "Ring of Fire," an arc of volcanoes and fault lines encircling the Pacific Basin. (***)

Indonesia plans massive immunizations in earthquake zone
BANTUL, Yogyakarta (AP) Indonesia prepared Tuesday to immunize tens of thousands of earthquake survivors against tetanus and measles, as a nearby volcano sent out fresh clouds of searing hot gas clouds and lava streams.

The Mount Merapi volcano added concerns in the area of central Java hardest hit by the 5.9 magnitude earthquake, which killed at least 5, 857 people and injured more than 30,000.

Activity at the mountain, which has a history of deadly explosions, increased after the quake, the latest in a string of natural disasters to hit the world's fourth most populous nation in recent years.

Health workers are concerned that the estimated 647,000 people displaced by the May 27 quake -- a third of whom are living in makeshift shelters with no toilets or running water -- are vulnerable to disease.

On Wednesday, the government and the World Health Organization were to begin immunizing all children under 5 in the quake zone against measles, said Harsaran Pandey, a WHO spokeswoman.

All adults in the quake zone would also receive a booster dose of tetanus vaccine, she said.

"There are lots of nails poking around that people can be cut on," she said.

Tetanus is an infection that usually originates from a contaminated wound, often a cut or deep puncture wound. It is fatal in more than 30 percent of cases, with even higher rates in the developing world.

Pandey said there had already been one suspected case of the disease.

On Monday, some 200 trucks, each filled with 4,000 kilograms of rice destined for the disaster zone, left the city square in the ancient royal capital of Yogyakarta.

"The government will ensure everybody gets food," said Vice President Jusuf Kalla, promising 10 kilograms of rice per person each month until survivors' houses were rebuilt.

The international relief effort has picked up pace in recent days, although aid has yet to reach some remote areas. The United Nations has appealed for US$103 million for recovery efforts over the next six months.

Indonesia is prone to seismic upheaval because of its location on the so-called Pacific "Ring of Fire," an arc of volcanoes and fault lines encircling the Pacific Basin. (***)

Indonesia plans massive immunizations in earthquake zone
BANTUL, Yogyakarta (AP) Indonesia prepared Tuesday to immunize tens of thousands of earthquake survivors against tetanus and measles, as a nearby volcano sent out fresh clouds of searing hot gas clouds and lava streams.

The Mount Merapi volcano added concerns in the area of central Java hardest hit by the 5.9 magnitude earthquake, which killed at least 5, 857 people and injured more than 30,000.

Activity at the mountain, which has a history of deadly explosions, increased after the quake, the latest in a string of natural disasters to hit the world's fourth most populous nation in recent years.

Health workers are concerned that the estimated 647,000 people displaced by the May 27 quake -- a third of whom are living in makeshift shelters with no toilets or running water -- are vulnerable to disease.

On Wednesday, the government and the World Health Organization were to begin immunizing all children under 5 in the quake zone against measles, said Harsaran Pandey, a WHO spokeswoman.

All adults in the quake zone would also receive a booster dose of tetanus vaccine, she said.

"There are lots of nails poking around that people can be cut on," she said.

Tetanus is an infection that usually originates from a contaminated wound, often a cut or deep puncture wound. It is fatal in more than 30 percent of cases, with even higher rates in the developing world.

Pandey said there had already been one suspected case of the disease.

On Monday, some 200 trucks, each filled with 4,000 kilograms of rice destined for the disaster zone, left the city square in the ancient royal capital of Yogyakarta.

"The government will ensure everybody gets food," said Vice President Jusuf Kalla, promising 10 kilograms of rice per person each month until survivors' houses were rebuilt.

The international relief effort has picked up pace in recent days, although aid has yet to reach some remote areas. The United Nations has appealed for US$103 million for recovery efforts over the next six months.

Indonesia is prone to seismic upheaval because of its location on the so-called Pacific "Ring of Fire," an arc of volcanoes and fault lines encircling the Pacific Basin. (***)

http://www.thejakartapost.com/detaillgen.asp?fileid=20060606105642&irec=0
_________________________
"People say funny things......."

Peter Kay

Top
#30895 - 07 Jun 06 15:14 Re: Yogyakarta Earthquake
KuKuKaChu Moderator Offline
Pooh Bah

Registered: 09 Oct 05
Posts: 10790
Loc: Centre of the Universe
From The Jakarta Post http://www.thejakartapost.com/detailheadlines.asp?fileid=20060607.B01&irec=2

What's with this post-disaster xenophobia?

Endy M. Bayuni, Jakarta

Unbelievably, it's happening again. No sooner than foreign troops (mostly medical personnel) and volunteers had set foot in Yogyakarta to help victims of the May 27 devastating earthquake, people in high positions in Jakarta were demanding to know how soon it would be until they left and whether there was a need for their presence beyond the present.

The same fuss was made during the massive international relief operation in the wake of the earthquake and tsunami in Nanggroe Aceh Darussalam in December 2004.

Vice president Jusuf Kalla then literally gave marching orders for all foreign troops to leave Indonesia within three months, amid allegations, again made by politicians in Jakarta, that these troops were conducting espionage on behalf of their governments. Others were concerned the largely Western foreign volunteers were out to convert the mainly Muslim Acehnese to Christianity en masse.

This time around, there are no such allegations of spying or proselytizing. Yogyakarta, unlike Aceh then, is not a conflict zone, and it has a sizable Christian population. The foreign personnel are mainly medical workers, not members of the armed forces.

But still, the fact that questions about the presence of foreigners and about their length of stay were raised at all, mostly by people in Jakarta rather than by victims in Yogyakarta, at a time like this is revealing, if not disturbing.

It shows the prevailing xenophobic sentiments among some senior government officials and politicians. It's a sentiment that must be so overwhelming that they cannot even refrain from publicly raising the issue in the first place.

The correct Indonesian way is never to question the presence of guests who have come with the noblest of intentions. Most of us have been taught from childhood that it is simply downright rude to even ask guests when they plan to leave, for such a question is tantamount to a request for them to leave. And these are no ordinary guests. They have come to help us in a time of crisis and despair.

It is therefore perplexing that some people in key government positions are even contemplating the question, when surely there must be other, far more pressing issues to deal with in helping the victims of the quake, including restoring their livelihoods and becoming better coordinated, than worrying about the presence of a bunch of well-meaning foreigners.

Their claim that there are already too many doctors and too many make-shift hospitals in Yogyakarta does not conform with the barrage of news stating that many victims of the quake are still not getting the medical attention they need one week after the disaster.

Even if their claim is true, isn't it better to have a surplus of doctors, medicine and hospital facilities than to have a shortage? At a time like this, there can never be enough doctors and medicine.

And even if it is true that Yogyakarta does not need any more foreign medical personnel, is it really for the host nation to decide when they should leave? These foreign troops and volunteers would not stay a day longer than necessary and most will move on to the next tragedy in another part of the world once their services are no longer needed here.

They have been here less than one week and we have already made them feel that they have overstayed their welcome.

Around the same time last week, just as Singaporean volunteers, who were among the first to arrive in Yogyakarta, were busy attending to the injured, some members of the House of Representatives in Jakarta had the audacity to call on the government not to send an envoy to the Indonesian Embassy in Singapore because of the latter's reported reluctance to sign an extradition treaty with Jakarta.

Their timing could not have been worse.

And since these demands were made by people in leadership positions, Indonesia once again comes across as an ungrateful nation to the outside world. That was the impression we created after the Aceh tsunami and it is exactly the image we are projecting again this time around.

Usually, a crisis brings out the best of us. In Indonesia, a big tragedy, like the Aceh tsunami or the Yogyakarta quake, consistently exposes the ugly side of us.

When the quake struck Yogyakarta last week, the government wasted no time in appealing for international help. But only a few days later, we are virtually telling them, we'll take your money and aid, but please go now.

The ugly xenophobic within apparently got the better of us once again.

Whatever happened to the Indonesian, or even Javanese, courtesy that we often pride ourselves on?

A simple "thank you" surely would have been much nicer.
_________________________
KuKuKaChu: dangerously too sophisticated

Top
#30896 - 08 Jun 06 13:25 Re: Yogyakarta Earthquake
KuKuKaChu Moderator Offline
Pooh Bah

Registered: 09 Oct 05
Posts: 10790
Loc: Centre of the Universe
AP

15,000 flee from Indonesia's Mount Merapi

By ROBERT KENNEDY, Associated Press Writer

MOUNT MERAPI, Indonesia - Indonesia's most dangerous volcano spewed a spectacular roiling cloud of hot gas and ash down its southern slope Thursday, sending more than 15,000 villagers fleeing to safety, scientists said.

Mount Merapi has been venting steam and ash for weeks, but the Thursday morning burst was the largest yet, with billowing, dark gray clouds avalanching 3 1/2 miles down its slopes, said Sugiono, an Indonesian vulcanologist who like many Indonesians goes by one name.

It was one of a series of powerful explosions early Thursday.

Some scientists say a powerful May 27 earthquake that killed more than 5,700 people in an area just 25 miles south of Mount Merapi may have contributed to the volcano's volatility in recent weeks.

The rumbling mountain's lava dome has swelled, raising concerns that it could suddenly collapse and send scalding clouds of fast-moving gas, lava and rocks into areas that have yet to be evacuated.

"A lot of people are panicking," said Sutomo, a government official at the scene, adding that 3,500 people had fled Sleman district on Merapi's southern side, some running and others piling in trucks and heading to nearby towns at the base.

Another 12,000 left their villages in Magelang district on the west side, officials said.

The government raised Merapi's alert to the highest level three weeks ago and started evacuating thousands of people living within four miles of the crater to government shelters, schools and camps. Some people refused orders to leave, however, saying they wanted to tend to their livestock and crops on the volcano's fertile slopes.

Stubborn villagers said Thursday that the latest burst would not scare them off.

"We are worried, but we won't leave," a villager named Supriatun told The Associated Press by mobile phone. "As long as the hot clouds do not reach us, we won't leave our village."
_________________________
KuKuKaChu: dangerously too sophisticated

Top
#30897 - 09 Jun 06 07:34 Re: Yogyakarta Earthquake
Magpie Offline
Member**

Registered: 29 Mar 06
Posts: 1306
Loc: The Toon
Merapi more than just a mountain
By Jonathan Head
BBC News, Yogyakarta


Local people say they know what to expect from the volcano
If you believe in the significance of anniversaries, there could still be plenty to fear from Mount Merapi, the volcano on Java which has been spewing out ash and lava for the past three weeks.

Travel a short distance west of the mountain, and you come across the magnificent Buddhist monument of Borobudur.

It was built during the eighth and ninth centuries, but its breathtaking reliefs and stupas were hidden from the rest of the world for eight centuries, after a massive eruption by Merapi covered it with ash.

The year was 1006, the last time the volcano really blew its top.

Since then Merapi has been very active, but confined itself to smaller eruptions that only endanger those living on its upper slopes.

'Nothing dramatic'

And despite the anniversary, that is all the vulcanologists believe it is going to do this time.

The millions of people crowded lower down, under Merapi's shadow, are not at risk from a Krakatoa-style cataclysm. But the mountain is still unpredictable; its cone is steep and fragile.

Mystic defies volcano alert
So the government is trying to persuade the several thousand who live in higher villages that they must stay in the temporary camps, set up in schools and public buildings.

It is not having much success. Although all the roads leading up into the danger zone are now barred by police road-blocks, they invariably allow local residents to go back to their villages to look after their homes and livestock.

When we drove nervously up to the highest village on Merapi's southern slope, all the men were sitting there, apparently unconcerned by all the volcanic activity 1,000 metres above them.

We know this mountain, they said. We don't believe it's going to do anything dramatic.

Ignored

Most of the women, children and elderly are still hanging on in the camps, but their patience is wearing thin.


People are tired of camp life and want to go home
There is a pretty well-oiled relief operation looking after them, but still they are starting to complain about the food, the cramped sleeping quarters, and an assortment of ailments afflicting the children. They want to go home.

You would think the experience of a neighbouring village 12 years ago would counsel more caution. Then there were eruptions on a similar scale to those of the past three weeks, and they were also ignored by local people.

Sixty died horrible deaths after being engulfed in a scalding cloud of gas that spewed suddenly out of the crater.

But the local people do not listen to government officials. They listen to Marijan, the old "gate-keeper" to the volcano who enjoys an intimate spiritual relationship with Merapi.

He insists there is nothing to worry about, and he has refused official pleading that he set an example to everyone else and come down from the danger zone.

Sacred site


Mt Merapi is sacred to the people of central Java
Merapi is much more than just a mountain to the people of central Java.

It is seen as a representation of the sacred Mount Meru of Hindu mythology, or as the home of more ancient Javanese spirits, and as one of the forces governing the fortunes of the old royal city of Yogyakarta, along with Ratu Kidul, the treacherous goddess of the south seas.

The Sultan of Yogyakarta, although a devout Muslim like most of his subjects, pays homage to these forces in yearly rituals.

Benign or malevolent, they are something people here have lived with for so long it is difficult for them to take the warnings of the vulcanologists that seriously.

If Merapi does live up to its reputation for dangerous unpredictability, there is still a chance that someone will get hurt.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/4994464.stm
_________________________
"People say funny things......."

Peter Kay

Top
#30898 - 16 Jun 06 04:51 Re: Yogyakarta Earthquake
Magpie Offline
Member**

Registered: 29 Mar 06
Posts: 1306
Loc: The Toon
NGOs in new plea for Java funds

Agencies say 1.5 million people could be homeless
Six aid organisations have issued a new appeal for funds to help survivors of last month's earthquake in Indonesia.
Relief operations are "hamstrung because of a lack of funds from donors", the agencies said in a joint statement.

David MacDonald of Oxfam said that the scale of the disaster was much greater than originally thought.

The Indonesian government has estimated that up to 1.5 million people have been left homeless.

It puts the number of homes destroyed at 156,964, with another 183,741 homes severely damaged, the statement said. The figure of 1.5 million people is based on an average of five people per house.

"The number of homeless people and extent of the damage is higher than after the 2004 tsunami in Indonesia," said Johan Kieft, emergency response team leader for CARE Indonesia.

'Different scenario'

The statement comes from Oxfam International, Islamic Relief, World Vision, CARE Indonesia, CARDI/IRC and Plan International.

The UN said on 1 June said more than $100m (54m) would be needed for relief work over the next six months. Only $21m of that had been promised so far, the statement said.

"Donors responded swiftly in the initial stages," says Mr MacDonald, country programme manager for Oxfam Indonesia, "but now we need them to evaluate their commitments to reflect ongoing urgent needs for the basics such as shelter, water and sanitation."

Oxfam spokesman in Yogyakarta Harriet Binet confirmed that estimates of those left homeless had risen dramatically.

"In the early days, there wasn't accurate assessment and evaluation done by appropriate authorities," she told the BBC. This was because officials were focusing on the immediate relief effort, she said.

"We are looking at a totally different scenario now," she said.

More than 5,700 people died in the earthquake that hit central Java province on 27 May, according to the latest Indonesian government estimates.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/5083488.stm
_________________________
"People say funny things......."

Peter Kay

Top
#30899 - 30 Jun 06 07:28 Re: Yogyakarta Earthquake
Magpie Offline
Member**

Registered: 29 Mar 06
Posts: 1306
Loc: The Toon
Tsunami funds to help Nias quake victims

Thursday June 29, 10:08 PM

Some of the $1 billion committed by the federal government to help rebuild tsunami-affected Indonesia has been diverted to help earthquake victims in Yogyakarta and Nias.

A report on Australian aid funds says $147 million has been spent to date rebuilding communities in Aceh devastated by the tsunami which hit the region on Boxing Day 2004.

But of the $1 billion in tsunami assistance announced by Prime Minister John Howard on January 5 last year, $63 million has been earmarked for other reconstruction and development purposes.

In a joint statement, Foreign Minister Alexander Downer and Treasurer Peter Costello said all of the $1 billion had been allocated, although not all of the money would reach tsunami victims.

"All of these funds have now been allocated to high-priority reconstruction and development activities, both within and beyond tsunami-affected areas," they said.

The ministers said $30 million of the tsunami funds would go towards rebuilding infrastructure around Yogyakarta damaged by the May 27 earthquake which killed 5,800 people.

"This assistance will help restore and rebuild schools, health facilities and housing, as well as assisting people in re-establishing livelihoods," their statement said.

The $30 million for Yogyakarta is on top of the $7.5 million the Australian government has committed in emergency and relief assistance.

Australia will also contribute $33 million towards reconstruction work in Aceh and Nias, comprising $10 million to rebuild roads and schools and $23 million to provide housing.

The federal government and Indonesia established the Australia-Indonesia Partnership for Reconstruction and Development (AIPRD) in response to the tsunami.

The ministers used the report's release to announce all Indonesian development assistance would now come under the AIPRD, bringing to $2 billion the amount of Australian aid going to our northern neighbour over five years.

The report praises the efforts to date in restoring infrastructure and services in Aceh.

"Some 18 months after the tsunami the progress of reconstruction is impressive," it says.

"Markets are functioning again, children are back at school, new teachers have been trained, the main hospital and seaport are functioning and village infrastructure and homes are being rebuilt."

http://au.news.yahoo.com//060627/2/zkbt.html
_________________________
"People say funny things......."

Peter Kay

Top
Page 4 of 4 < 1 2 3 4


Moderator:  kenyeung, NetCop